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Reptile brains respond to music
#1
This is new research and there will need to be a lot more study done before the results are conclusive. However scientists chose a Nile crocodile since they have existed with little change over the last 200 million years. The did an MRI brain scan and observed how the crocodile brain responded to stimuli. 

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&ur...z71Z1SZOqQ


It is interesting that the crocodile brain responded similar to the way birds respond. It is interesting that a reptile responds at all. 
Sound is not a major part of their communications. 
I am happy to know that the response to classical music was strong. Maybe my snakes really do like it when I play classical music.
I will be interested to see what further studies show.
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Catherine

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#2
Well....I am not at all surprised!
Most animals love music. They do seem to prefer classical, especially light and gentle classical. I don't see why reptiles should be any exception.

They are interesting findings. Bit by bit we are starting to learn about animals. I think our Souls already know that -it's just that human brains have to catch up with the knowledge!
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#3
It seems that most animals respond to classical music. Classical does have gentle rhythms that flow in a way that touches the spirit. Why wouldn't reptiles respond the way other animals do. Reptiles are quiet and they sometimes seem unresponsive, but I think there is a lot more going on than we realize.

I can't wait until they test snake responses to music. I just don't know how they will be able to do it. It s not good to sedate a snake. They already have a low metabolic rate. Maybe they could be chilled enough to lie still for an MRI.

These are exciting times. We can really learn about our animal friends.


Quote:They are interesting findings. Bit by bit we are starting to learn about animals. I think our Souls already know that -it's just that human brains have to catch up with the knowledge!
I agree with you. We deep down inside already know that there is much more to animals than we once thought.
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Catherine

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#4
(05-13-2018, 04:15 PM)Catherine Wrote: I can't wait until they test snake responses to music. I just don't know how they will be able to do it. It s not good to sedate a snake. They already have a low metabolic rate. Maybe they could be chilled enough to lie still for an MRI.

It is worth experimenting with music for that purpose. It could work very well. I am sure the snakes would hear it and like it. But of course they may have their own personal tastes in music. I know Misty had. She introduced me to composers I hadn't given much thought to before.

I wonder if anyone has ever tried to hypnotise a snake?
That, if it worked, would help for scans and MRIs too. Is it always sedation the vet uses? That can be dangerous for many species.
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#5
For an MRI it is essential that you not move if they are going to get an image.
Some snakes don't move much anyhow so it might work. However in a strange place a snake would be restless. I would put the snake in a small container where it would curl up quietly. It might work.

Sedation would be dangerous. Snakes would not respond well to sedation.

I don't know about hypnotizing a snake. They tend to see a heat signature rather than detail. They hear through vibrations and have no external ears. I am not sure you could get a snake's attention long enough to hypnotize it. If you did have its full attention it might think food and strike. 

I do think they like mellow sounds rather than jarring sounds. Classical music should appeal to them. Maybe they would like jazz. I should do some music experiments. I could pick the same time on the same day and try different types of music.
I am pretty sure they all like Pachelbel.
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Catherine

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