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Russia killing strays ahead of the World Cup
#1
Just like the Sochi Games, the World Cup has triggered a rush of cleanup jobs in various Russian cities. One of the biggest jobs is cleaning up the stray dog problem. The local governments pay companies to kill the dogs. Inhumane methods are acceptable and are routinely used. None of this is against the law in Russia. The same companies that were criticized during the Sochi games are being awarded contracts again.
The only thing that helped protect dogs in Sochi was outside publicity. So once again we are making a stray dog atrocity public.

https://deadspin.com/the-world-cup-is-co...1826012469

I am sure we will find other articles and petitions. I will keep looking. Be sure to pass this on. The countries going to the games should know and should be protesting this. I hope the players themselves become aware and try to do something. This kind of cull is never acceptable.

https://themoscowtimes.com/articles/as-f...dogs-61228


https://www.rferl.org/a/russia-stray-dog...76479.html

I found the petition.

https://www.change.org/p/stop-killing-ho...-fifa-2018

We should have known to look for this sooner.
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Catherine

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#2
From the first article:

“We could sit here sniffling all day, but I am working within the framework of our constitution,” Alexei Sorokin, the owner of Basya Service, told the Moscow Times. “Why are we worrying about dogs when we should be worried about people?”

That sums up the attitude of the Russian local authorities, who are more worried about the visitors to the World Cup finding some stray dogs in the street than about animal welfare issues. Unfortunately, the decisions are being taken at a local level, not by central government, so petitions are not so easy to target as when central government is responsible. This is the same as in the USA, where a person ill-treating an animal can be prosecuted in one state, but cannot be prosecuted in another, because state laws vary.
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#3
(06-12-2018, 07:11 PM)LPC Wrote: From the first article:

“We could sit here sniffling all day, but I am working within the framework of our constitution,” Alexei Sorokin, the owner of Basya Service, told the Moscow Times. “Why are we worrying about dogs when we should be worried about people?”

That sums up the attitude of the Russian local authorities....

What a cold heartless response. He is not the first and he won't be the last, to feel this way unfortunately.
Poor dogs.
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#4
Every time there is some major world sports event the stray dogs become the scape goat for all the things the host country has failed to do. Many of these countries have some serious social issues, human rights issues, health issues and infrastructure issues. So what do they focus on? Killing stray dogs so outsiders will not see strays. Issues like homelessness and unemployment do not matter as long as there are no stray dogs. The stray dogs are a symptom of other problems. Instead of solving problems  culling stray dogs draws attention to them.

Just once I would like to read about a sports event that benefited the host country, including the homeless animals.

Even the Olympics in Vancouver had its problems. They ran sled dog rides during the event for the tourists. When it was over and the tourists had gone home they killed a hundred sled dogs rather than find a place for them.

Does this just happen with sports events or do other gatherings involve animal abuse?
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Catherine

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#5
(06-13-2018, 02:32 PM)Catherine Wrote: Even the Olympics in Vancouver had its problems. They ran sled dog rides during the event for the tourists. When it was over and the tourists had gone home they killed a hundred sled dogs rather than find a place for them.
I didn't know about that! What a terrible thing to happen. What excuse did they feebly offer for not attempting to find homes for them? Or even a no-kill shelter? Where did they get the dogs from in the first place, anyway?

(P.S. I deleted your identical, duplicate post to the one above. Perhaps the initial post did not show up at first?)
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#6
(06-13-2018, 02:32 PM)Catherine Wrote: Every time there is some major world sports event the stray dogs become the scape goat for all the things the host country has failed to do. Many of these countries have some serious social issues, human rights issues, health issues and infrastructure issues. So what do they focus on? Killing stray dogs so outsiders will not see strays. Issues like homelessness and unemployment do not matter as long as there are no stray dogs. The stray dogs are a symptom of other problems. Instead of solving problems  culling stray dogs draws attention to them.

Just once I would like to read about a sports event that benefited the host country, including the homeless animals.

Even the Olympics in Vancouver had its problems. They ran sled dog rides during the event for the tourists. When it was over and the tourists had gone home they killed a hundred sled dogs rather than find a place for them.

Does this just happen with sports events or do other gatherings involve animal abuse?

Yes, the dogs running wild draw attention to many things that are wrong in that host country. I would say the most obvious thing that is wrong in such a case, is lack of proper facilities for those dogs to be rounded up, housed, spayed/neutered, taken care of, and adopted out! With adoption fees and proper charitable organisation for funding, that could pay for itself in the long run. All it needs is the will and some hard work.
But the attitude is deeply negative towards them. They are just dogs and just a nuisance.

The dogs look untidy, and will hassle the tourists for food. There will be dog mess about the place. They might even bite. They might have rabies.....that is the thinking behind it. And what retarded thinking!

Especially if we remember that somewhere along the line some humans turned these dogs out to fend for themselves.

And I am absolutely shocked and horrified to hear about what happened to those sled dogs. How wicked!
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#7
Quote:(P.S. I deleted your identical, duplicate post to the one above. Perhaps the initial post did not show up at first?)

That is strange. There was no duplicate post when I logged out last night. I didn't have any problems making the post so there shouldn't have been a duplicate. It is yet another computer mystery.

There was a high demand for sled dogs during the Vancouver Olympics. Tourists wanted to do something "Canadian".
After it was over and summer was coming there was no use for the dogs. The company took the cheap way out. They just shot them all. We did have a thread on the subject, but I can't find it.


I think the presence of stray dogs indicates a failure or lack of social programs in a society. If everything was going well there would not be dogs on the streets. The problem would have been taken care of. Rather than fix the problem, it is easier to kill the dogs and pretend there is no problem. It seems to happen every time a major public sporting event is being held. The host country wants everything to look nice and is willing to commit any atrocity to achieve that goal.

On that note, 8 years from now Canada, Mexico and the USA will be cohosting the world cup. They won't be shooting dogs on the streets of Toronto, but I wonder about some of the other locations. It still matters that we watch Toronto in case they come up with something just as bad.
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Catherine

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#8
(06-14-2018, 04:45 PM)Catherine Wrote: There was a high demand for sled dogs during the Vancouver Olympics. Tourists wanted to do something "Canadian".
After it was over and summer was coming there was no use for the dogs. The company took the cheap way out. They just shot them all. We did have a thread on the subject, but I can't find it.
I don't think we ever had a thread specifically on that topic. But I did find this:

http://www.animalloverswebforum.com/show...p?tid=2912

The link, sadly, goes to a generic page and does not mention sled dogs. Maybe that was why I hadn't heard of this before. Anyway, I am surprised that a very civilised country like Canada did not have more of a reaction to the mass killing. (Sorry for the departure from the original topic of this thread!)
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#9
There have been protests about homophobia in Moscow on the fringe of the World Cup. Of course, the protesters were broken up by police.

But no protests against the mass killing of innocent dogs!
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#10
That says it all....
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